Terrine en Bocaux
Terrine en Bocaux

 Home canning or 'Bottling' is a method of preservation still very popular in rural France.  I first learnt this technique from good friend Charlotte Clement, now co owner of Table de Touron, specialising in culinery visits in South West France, where pate, terrrine and fois gras are amongst the favourites to put up 'en bocaux'.  This image is of a simple terrine recipe flavoured with cep and armanac I used for the first 'Everything but the Oink' workshop held at Hart's Bakery in 2015.

Image: Fergus Coyle

  "Alpine" cheese produced at Westcombe Dairy .  It is often said that these mountain style cheeses cannot be made using milk from cows fed on silage, due to the excessive gassing that it produces within the cheese.  Head cheesemaker Tom Calver took this as a challenge and as an oppertunity to better understand the unwanted gassing that occasionally takes place in traditional cheddar.  Although this experimental cheese is produced in very small numbers and is only available in the Dairy Shop, it has gathered a strong following from those who venture down into Somerset to find it.     Image: Paul Burton   

"Alpine" cheese produced at Westcombe Dairy.  It is often said that these mountain style cheeses cannot be made using milk from cows fed on silage, due to the excessive gassing that it produces within the cheese.  Head cheesemaker Tom Calver took this as a challenge and as an oppertunity to better understand the unwanted gassing that occasionally takes place in traditional cheddar.  Although this experimental cheese is produced in very small numbers and is only available in the Dairy Shop, it has gathered a strong following from those who venture down into Somerset to find it.  

Image: Paul Burton
 

  Belly, Loin or Chop.   Mid way through the evening at 'Everything but the Oink' 2016.    Image:   todayimbobbi

Belly, Loin or Chop.  Mid way through the evening at 'Everything but the Oink' 2016. 

Image: todayimbobbi

 Jars being filled for Pate at Source Food Hall and Cafe, Bristol.  The method of 'bottling' force meats allows them to be kept at ambient temperatures for months without any detriment to the quality or safety of the product.   Image: Paul Burton

Jars being filled for Pate at Source Food Hall and Cafe, Bristol.  The method of 'bottling' force meats allows them to be kept at ambient temperatures for months without any detriment to the quality or safety of the product.

Image: Paul Burton

 Stages of developement from incubation through drying to maturation.  Cappacollo and Noisette de Jambon.    Images: Paul Burton

Stages of developement from incubation through drying to maturation.  Cappacollo and Noisette de Jambon. 

Images: Paul Burton

   Duckett's Caerphilly .  Mould ripened unpastaurised Caerphilly Cheese, produced at Westcombe Dairy.   There is a long tradition of Caerphilly Cheese being produced in Somerset, ever since the 1800s, when Welsh settlers brought their cheese making recipes to the county.  These were quickly adopted by the cheddar makers, seeing Caerphilly as a cash crop, ready for sale in a fraction of the time it took for the traditional cloth bound cheddar to mature.  Although the production and tradition of Welsh and Somerset Caerphilly have run along side each other for over a hundred years there are differences between the two, with the somerset variety tending to be matured for longer than its Welsh counter parts, owing to the cheese aging disposition of west-country cheddar makers.   Image: Paul Burton

Duckett's Caerphilly.  Mould ripened unpastaurised Caerphilly Cheese, produced at Westcombe Dairy.  There is a long tradition of Caerphilly Cheese being produced in Somerset, ever since the 1800s, when Welsh settlers brought their cheese making recipes to the county.  These were quickly adopted by the cheddar makers, seeing Caerphilly as a cash crop, ready for sale in a fraction of the time it took for the traditional cloth bound cheddar to mature.  Although the production and tradition of Welsh and Somerset Caerphilly have run along side each other for over a hundred years there are differences between the two, with the somerset variety tending to be matured for longer than its Welsh counter parts, owing to the cheese aging disposition of west-country cheddar makers.

Image: Paul Burton

 Rose Veal from Weston's Farm, near Tiverton, Devon is produced from the bull calves of a small Chanel Island milking herd that are grown on to 6-9 month in airy straw bedded barns with access to the out doors, giving this beatiful and under-used meat its distinct colour and flavour.    Image: Paul Burton

Rose Veal from Weston's Farm, near Tiverton, Devon is produced from the bull calves of a small Chanel Island milking herd that are grown on to 6-9 month in airy straw bedded barns with access to the out doors, giving this beatiful and under-used meat its distinct colour and flavour. 

Image: Paul Burton

 The underground Cheddar store at  Westcombe Dairy . Built into the hill side a natural 12c is provided year round.  This temperature in then lowered ever so slightly, by a cooling system using heat exchange from a natural spring to give optimum conditions for maturing the cheese.  This system also compensates for the heat generated by the cheese its self as it slowly ferments during maturation.   Image: Paul Burton

The underground Cheddar store at Westcombe Dairy. Built into the hill side a natural 12c is provided year round.  This temperature in then lowered ever so slightly, by a cooling system using heat exchange from a natural spring to give optimum conditions for maturing the cheese.  This system also compensates for the heat generated by the cheese its self as it slowly ferments during maturation.

Image: Paul Burton

 Charcuterie produced at  The Farm Cafe, St.Werburghs  from one of their own pigs grown to an incredible 104kg dead weight, allowing us to make charcuterie akin to that of generations past when pigs where routinely grown to this kind of weight using tradition breeds, the sort seldom found in modern pork production.   Image: Paul Burton

Charcuterie produced at The Farm Cafe, St.Werburghs from one of their own pigs grown to an incredible 104kg dead weight, allowing us to make charcuterie akin to that of generations past when pigs where routinely grown to this kind of weight using tradition breeds, the sort seldom found in modern pork production.

Image: Paul Burton

 Sardines on the counter at  Source Food Hall and Cafe .   Image: Paul Burton

Sardines on the counter at Source Food Hall and Cafe.

Image: Paul Burton

 Slow Ferment Wheat and Rye.   Image: Paul Burton

Slow Ferment Wheat and Rye.

Image: Paul Burton

 Leg of Pork, special-request scoring for pit roasting.    Image: Paul Burton

Leg of Pork, special-request scoring for pit roasting. 

Image: Paul Burton

 Salami Culture Test.  Full Blog post to follow   Image: Paul Burton

Salami Culture Test.  Full Blog post to follow

Image: Paul Burton

 Vintage phone-box smoker at  Westcombe Dairy .   Image: Paul Burton

Vintage phone-box smoker at Westcombe Dairy.

Image: Paul Burton

Terrine en Bocaux
  "Alpine" cheese produced at Westcombe Dairy .  It is often said that these mountain style cheeses cannot be made using milk from cows fed on silage, due to the excessive gassing that it produces within the cheese.  Head cheesemaker Tom Calver took this as a challenge and as an oppertunity to better understand the unwanted gassing that occasionally takes place in traditional cheddar.  Although this experimental cheese is produced in very small numbers and is only available in the Dairy Shop, it has gathered a strong following from those who venture down into Somerset to find it.     Image: Paul Burton   
  Belly, Loin or Chop.   Mid way through the evening at 'Everything but the Oink' 2016.    Image:   todayimbobbi
 Jars being filled for Pate at Source Food Hall and Cafe, Bristol.  The method of 'bottling' force meats allows them to be kept at ambient temperatures for months without any detriment to the quality or safety of the product.   Image: Paul Burton
 Stages of developement from incubation through drying to maturation.  Cappacollo and Noisette de Jambon.    Images: Paul Burton
   Duckett's Caerphilly .  Mould ripened unpastaurised Caerphilly Cheese, produced at Westcombe Dairy.   There is a long tradition of Caerphilly Cheese being produced in Somerset, ever since the 1800s, when Welsh settlers brought their cheese making recipes to the county.  These were quickly adopted by the cheddar makers, seeing Caerphilly as a cash crop, ready for sale in a fraction of the time it took for the traditional cloth bound cheddar to mature.  Although the production and tradition of Welsh and Somerset Caerphilly have run along side each other for over a hundred years there are differences between the two, with the somerset variety tending to be matured for longer than its Welsh counter parts, owing to the cheese aging disposition of west-country cheddar makers.   Image: Paul Burton
 Rose Veal from Weston's Farm, near Tiverton, Devon is produced from the bull calves of a small Chanel Island milking herd that are grown on to 6-9 month in airy straw bedded barns with access to the out doors, giving this beatiful and under-used meat its distinct colour and flavour.    Image: Paul Burton
 The underground Cheddar store at  Westcombe Dairy . Built into the hill side a natural 12c is provided year round.  This temperature in then lowered ever so slightly, by a cooling system using heat exchange from a natural spring to give optimum conditions for maturing the cheese.  This system also compensates for the heat generated by the cheese its self as it slowly ferments during maturation.   Image: Paul Burton
 Charcuterie produced at  The Farm Cafe, St.Werburghs  from one of their own pigs grown to an incredible 104kg dead weight, allowing us to make charcuterie akin to that of generations past when pigs where routinely grown to this kind of weight using tradition breeds, the sort seldom found in modern pork production.   Image: Paul Burton
 Sardines on the counter at  Source Food Hall and Cafe .   Image: Paul Burton
 Slow Ferment Wheat and Rye.   Image: Paul Burton
 Leg of Pork, special-request scoring for pit roasting.    Image: Paul Burton
 Salami Culture Test.  Full Blog post to follow   Image: Paul Burton
 Vintage phone-box smoker at  Westcombe Dairy .   Image: Paul Burton
Terrine en Bocaux

 Home canning or 'Bottling' is a method of preservation still very popular in rural France.  I first learnt this technique from good friend Charlotte Clement, now co owner of Table de Touron, specialising in culinery visits in South West France, where pate, terrrine and fois gras are amongst the favourites to put up 'en bocaux'.  This image is of a simple terrine recipe flavoured with cep and armanac I used for the first 'Everything but the Oink' workshop held at Hart's Bakery in 2015.

Image: Fergus Coyle

"Alpine" cheese produced at Westcombe Dairy.  It is often said that these mountain style cheeses cannot be made using milk from cows fed on silage, due to the excessive gassing that it produces within the cheese.  Head cheesemaker Tom Calver took this as a challenge and as an oppertunity to better understand the unwanted gassing that occasionally takes place in traditional cheddar.  Although this experimental cheese is produced in very small numbers and is only available in the Dairy Shop, it has gathered a strong following from those who venture down into Somerset to find it.  

Image: Paul Burton
 

Belly, Loin or Chop.  Mid way through the evening at 'Everything but the Oink' 2016. 

Image: todayimbobbi

Jars being filled for Pate at Source Food Hall and Cafe, Bristol.  The method of 'bottling' force meats allows them to be kept at ambient temperatures for months without any detriment to the quality or safety of the product.

Image: Paul Burton

Stages of developement from incubation through drying to maturation.  Cappacollo and Noisette de Jambon. 

Images: Paul Burton

Duckett's Caerphilly.  Mould ripened unpastaurised Caerphilly Cheese, produced at Westcombe Dairy.  There is a long tradition of Caerphilly Cheese being produced in Somerset, ever since the 1800s, when Welsh settlers brought their cheese making recipes to the county.  These were quickly adopted by the cheddar makers, seeing Caerphilly as a cash crop, ready for sale in a fraction of the time it took for the traditional cloth bound cheddar to mature.  Although the production and tradition of Welsh and Somerset Caerphilly have run along side each other for over a hundred years there are differences between the two, with the somerset variety tending to be matured for longer than its Welsh counter parts, owing to the cheese aging disposition of west-country cheddar makers.

Image: Paul Burton

Rose Veal from Weston's Farm, near Tiverton, Devon is produced from the bull calves of a small Chanel Island milking herd that are grown on to 6-9 month in airy straw bedded barns with access to the out doors, giving this beatiful and under-used meat its distinct colour and flavour. 

Image: Paul Burton

The underground Cheddar store at Westcombe Dairy. Built into the hill side a natural 12c is provided year round.  This temperature in then lowered ever so slightly, by a cooling system using heat exchange from a natural spring to give optimum conditions for maturing the cheese.  This system also compensates for the heat generated by the cheese its self as it slowly ferments during maturation.

Image: Paul Burton

Charcuterie produced at The Farm Cafe, St.Werburghs from one of their own pigs grown to an incredible 104kg dead weight, allowing us to make charcuterie akin to that of generations past when pigs where routinely grown to this kind of weight using tradition breeds, the sort seldom found in modern pork production.

Image: Paul Burton

Sardines on the counter at Source Food Hall and Cafe.

Image: Paul Burton

Slow Ferment Wheat and Rye.

Image: Paul Burton

Leg of Pork, special-request scoring for pit roasting. 

Image: Paul Burton

Salami Culture Test.  Full Blog post to follow

Image: Paul Burton

Vintage phone-box smoker at Westcombe Dairy.

Image: Paul Burton

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